News about conservation, straight to your inbox. Sign up now.

Thank you for joining the CI Community!

Conservation International Statement on the Signing of the DELTA Act

January 9, 2019

“Environmental leadership in the U.S. has long been a bipartisan effort and today, the DELTA Act joins that proud history.

“The greater Okavango delta is like no other place in the world. Sometimes called Africa’s ‘Last Eden,’ the Okavango delta supports the largest population of elephants in the world and is crucial to jobs and livelihoods of over a million people across three countries. Rich in nature and culture, and a magnet for tourists from the US and around the world, the delta is under threat from unsustainable development, demands on water, and wildlife poaching.

“With this legislation, the U.S. will be able to lend its expertise to help combat wildlife trafficking and promote sound development practices that will meet the needs of the communities who are dependent on the delta and increase social and economic stability in southern Africa.

“This legislation is a great example of U.S. global leadership in international conservation. Conservation International has a long history in supporting the people and nature, which also happens to be one of my favorite places in the world. I’d like to thank the bill’s sponsors, many of whom have been strong supporters of the environment, Representatives Jeff Fortenberry, Ed Royce, and Eliot Engle and Senators Portman, Udall, Burr, Coons, and Whitehouse for their hard work on this legislation,” said Sanjayan.


About Conservation International

Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”, “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.