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Michael Cooperman, Ph.D.

Research Scientist, Freshwater Ecology and Fisheries, Moore Center for Science

Location
U.S. (Arlington)
Languages
English

Michael Cooperman, Ph.D.

Research Scientist, Freshwater Ecology and Fisheries, Moore Center for Science

Michael Cooperman, Ph.D., provides technical guidance and support to Conservation International's strategy and projects focusing on freshwater issues. Michael’s current projects include developing a comprehensive research program addressing how climate change will affect inland fisheries yield and helping to design long term monitoring and management plans related to hydro-power development.

Dr. Cooperman is a fish ecologist with primary interest in the protection and recovery of small and declining fish populations. Areas of expertise include the physiological-ecology of fish, fish migration, the early life history of fishes, the impacts of dams and other water development projects on river ecosystems, and the management of in-land (aka freshwater) fisheries. He is the lead investigator of Conservation International’s Hot Fish project, a comprehensive research program exploring how freshwater fishes of the tropics will respond to warming water temperatures and the consequences for human food security. He is also co-Principle Investigator for Conservation International’s program to describe the natural history and ecology of socio-economically important fish species of Tonle Sap Lake, Cambodia and helping design long term monitoring and management plans related to changing land use practices and large-scale hydro-power development within Cambodia.

Michael earned a MS degree in the ecology of river-floodplain systems from the University of Montana in 1998 and his doctorate from Oregon State University in 2004 where his dissertation research addressed the natural history and ecology of the larval life stage of endangered Lost River and shortnose suckers in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon and the impact of water management policy on sucker populations. Prior to joining Conservation International in 2011, Michael completed a three year post-doctoral position at the University of British Columbia where he worked on both the effectiveness evaluation of stream restoration for salmon recovery projects and the physiological ecology of Fraser River Late Run sockeye salmon migration. Michael also served two years as a National Research Council post-doctoral fellow in residence with NOAA-Fisheries studying the ecology and management of Gulf of Maine Atlantic Salmon smolts.

Selected scientific papers

  • Cooperman, M. S., S. Nam, M. Arias, T. Cochrane, V. Elliott, T. Hand, L. Hannah, G. W. Holtgrieve, L. Kaufman, A. A. Koning, J. Koponen, V. Kum, K. S. McCann, P. B. McIntyre, B. Min, C. Ou, N. Rooney, K. A. Rose, J. L. Sabo and K. O. Winemiller. 2012. A watershed moment for the Mekong: Newly announced community use and conservation areas for the Tonle Sap Lake may boost sustainability of the world’s largest inland fishery. Cambodian Journal of Natural History 2012(2): 101-106.
  • Cooperman, M. S., S. G. Hinch, G. T. Crossin, S. J. Cooke, D. A. Patterson, I. Olsson, A. G. Lotto, D. W. Welch, J. M. Shrimpton, G. Van Der Kraak and A. P. Farrell. 2010. Effects of Experimental Manipulations of Salinity and Maturation Status on the Physiological Condition and Mortality of Homing Adult Sockeye Salmon Held in a Laboratory. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology 83: 459-472.
  • Cooperman, M.S., D.F. Markle, M. Terwilliger and D.C. Simon. 2010. A production estimate approach to analyze habitat and weather effects on recruitment of two endangered freshwater fish. Can J Fish Aquat Sci 67: 28-41.
  • Cooperman, M. S., S. G. Hinch, S. Bennett, M. A. Branton, R. V. Galbraith, J. T. Quigley and B. A. Heise. 2007. Streambank restoration effectiveness: Lessons learned from a comparative study. Fisheries 32: 278-291.
  • Cooperman, M. S. and D. F. Markle. 2003. Rapid out-migration of Lost River and shortnose sucker larvae from in-river spawning beds to in-lake rearing grounds. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 132: 1138-1153.​​

Dr. Cooperman is a fish ecologist with primary interest in the protection and recovery of small and declining fish populations. Areas of expertise include the physiological-ecology of fish, fish migration, the early life history of fishes, the impacts of dams and other water development projects on river ecosystems, and the management of in-land (aka freshwater) fisheries. He is the lead investigator of Conservation International’s Hot Fish project, a comprehensive research program exploring how freshwater fishes of the tropics will respond to warming water temperatures and the consequences for human food security. He is also co-Principle Investigator for Conservation International’s program to describe the natural history and ecology of socio-economically important fish species of Tonle Sap Lake, Cambodia and helping design long term monitoring and management plans related to changing land use practices and large-scale hydro-power development within Cambodia.

Michael earned a MS degree in the ecology of river-floodplain systems from the University of Montana in 1998 and his doctorate from Oregon State University in 2004 where his dissertation research addressed the natural history and ecology of the larval life stage of endangered Lost River and shortnose suckers in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon and the impact of water management policy on sucker populations. Prior to joining Conservation International in 2011, Michael completed a three year post-doctoral position at the University of British Columbia where he worked on both the effectiveness evaluation of stream restoration for salmon recovery projects and the physiological ecology of Fraser River Late Run sockeye salmon migration. Michael also served two years as a National Research Council post-doctoral fellow in residence with NOAA-Fisheries studying the ecology and management of Gulf of Maine Atlantic Salmon smolts.

Selected scientific papers

  • Cooperman, M. S., S. Nam, M. Arias, T. Cochrane, V. Elliott, T. Hand, L. Hannah, G. W. Holtgrieve, L. Kaufman, A. A. Koning, J. Koponen, V. Kum, K. S. McCann, P. B. McIntyre, B. Min, C. Ou, N. Rooney, K. A. Rose, J. L. Sabo and K. O. Winemiller. 2012. A watershed moment for the Mekong: Newly announced community use and conservation areas for the Tonle Sap Lake may boost sustainability of the world’s largest inland fishery. Cambodian Journal of Natural History 2012(2): 101-106.
  • Cooperman, M. S., S. G. Hinch, G. T. Crossin, S. J. Cooke, D. A. Patterson, I. Olsson, A. G. Lotto, D. W. Welch, J. M. Shrimpton, G. Van Der Kraak and A. P. Farrell. 2010. Effects of Experimental Manipulations of Salinity and Maturation Status on the Physiological Condition and Mortality of Homing Adult Sockeye Salmon Held in a Laboratory. Physiological and Biochemical Zoology 83: 459-472.
  • Cooperman, M.S., D.F. Markle, M. Terwilliger and D.C. Simon. 2010. A production estimate approach to analyze habitat and weather effects on recruitment of two endangered freshwater fish. Can J Fish Aquat Sci 67: 28-41.
  • Cooperman, M. S., S. G. Hinch, S. Bennett, M. A. Branton, R. V. Galbraith, J. T. Quigley and B. A. Heise. 2007. Streambank restoration effectiveness: Lessons learned from a comparative study. Fisheries 32: 278-291.
  • Cooperman, M. S. and D. F. Markle. 2003. Rapid out-migration of Lost River and shortnose sucker larvae from in-river spawning beds to in-lake rearing grounds. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 132: 1138-1153.​​
Talk to Me About
Aquaculture, Cambodia, Climate Change, Conservation Science, Ecology, Endangered Species, Energy-Water Nexus, Fish Biology, Fisheries, Fisheries Policy and Management, Fresh Water, Freshwater Resource Management and Policy, Hydrological Flows, Ichthyology, Integrated Freshwater Conservation, Ocean Science, Sustainable Fisheries
Location
U.S. (Arlington)
Languages
English