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Bonn Climate Change Conference

Bonn, Germany, June 17-27, 2019

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Representatives from 200 countries will meet to advance the implementation of the Paris Agreement at a moment of great urgency. A report released recently by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change delivered a stark warning on the cost of inaction on climate change. In response, Parties must use this negotiating session to find consensus on remaining implementation guidelines and signal intent to increase the ambition of their national climate commitments by 2020.​

Our Approach

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EditText Paragraph 1: Bonn Climate Change Conference

Learn more about this session on the UNFCCC website »
EditText Paragraph 2: SB 50 refers to the annual mid-year meeting of the member countries of the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). This year’s 50th meeting of the Subsidiary Bodies in Bonn, Germany, is important for advancing Parties’ shared objectives of stabilizing greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere.
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Natural climate solutions are critical to achieving the Paris Agreement goals. Protecting, sustainably managing and restoring forests and natural ecosystems are an indispensable part of the solution to climate change, providing at least 30 percent of the mitigation needed to limit global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius. Natural climate solutions should be part of our response to climate change, along with accelerating a decarbonization pathway.

Conservation International envisions a world where natural climate solutions are implemented to their fullest potential for mitigating climate change and are fully deployed in places where ecosystems can help vulnerable populations adapt to the already-present and future effects of climate change.

As stewards of lands that contain almost a quarter of the world’s land-based carbon, indigenous peoples and local communities are on the front lines of climate change. To recognize the importance of these stakeholders, Conservation International also works to connect indigenous peoples and local communities to funding, training and technology, helping to secure their land rights so that protecting nature also protects their livelihoods.​

Our Policy Stance at SB 50

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EditText Paragraph 1:Natural climate solutions include activities that reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+), conserve and restore marine ecosystems, enhance “blue” carbon stocks along coastlines, and harness the power of ecosystems to adapt to climate change (ecosystem-based adaptation). These actions can additionally provide socio-economic benefits beyond mitigation and adaptation, and are critical to accelerating our climate change response.
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Our SB 50 Position Paper
English (1.2MB PDF)

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    Conservation International works to equip decision-makers with accessible science and evidence to make informed decisions to restore and protect critical ecosystems as part of global climate action.

    At SB 50, Conservation International will strive to advance the role of nature in implementing the Paris Agreement by:

    Harnessing the role of nature to deliver natural climate action

    • Countries should aim to include climate action across all sectors in their revised Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), particularly natural climate solutions which address forests, wetlands and peatlands, coastal carbon management, ecosystem-based adaptation, REDD+ and climate-resilient agriculture, among others.

    Increasing efficiency for delivering climate goals and finance

    • Parties should facilitate the generation and robust accounting of emissions-reduction transfers across all sectors and enhance the potential for removals by sinks;
    • Any emissions reductions transferred from outside the scope of a country’s NDC should demonstrate robust baselines, monitoring, reporting and verification, and be subject to the same corresponding adjustment as other transfers; and
    • Parties should prepare guidance and the necessary systems to facilitate the acquisition of internationally transferred mitigation outcomes by Party and non-Party actors (such as the International Civil Aviation Organization’s market-based measure) in a way that ensures the avoidance of double counting.

    Considering critical issues of agriculture

    • Countries should link the Koronivia workshop topics with national-level policies and interventions that can be integrated into countries’ NDC revisions, including an explanation of the technical and financial support needed;
    • Smallholder farmers should be considered as a key actor in advancing action on these topics, specifically related to their inclusion in assessing adaptation outcomes as well as their importance for promoting integrated practices such as agroforestry for improved soil fertility.

    Ensuring full and effective participation

    • The LCIP Platform (LCIPP) should prioritize the creation of the local communities’ constituency. The LCIPP should be accompanied by a fully funded program with the Facilitative Working Group serving as a hub for coordination and collaboration among relevant organizations and supporting the capacity building of existing local and indigenous customary institutions.

    Considering critical issues of agriculture

    • Identify opportunities to link the Koronivia workshop topics with national-level policies and interventions that can be integrated into countries’ NDC revisions, as well as the technical and financial support needed; and
    • Discuss the role of smallholder farmers in advancing action on these topics, specifically related to their inclusion in assessing adaptation outcomes as well as their importance for promoting integrated practices such as agroforestry for improved soil fertility.

    Turning Science into Policy

    Our Experts

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    Lina Barrera

    Senior Director, International Policy, Social and Environmental Governance

    ​Lina Barrera leads Conservation International’s engagement in international policy arenas that that impact Conservation International priorities, such as those related to climate change, biodiversity and sustainable development. She works across the institution with field staff, scientists, and other experts to ensure that natural capital and its contribution to human well-being are fully considered in international policy decisions.

    Claudio Schneider, Ph.D.

    Senior Director, Technical Support, Conservation International-Peru

    Dr. Claudio Schneider has overseen the technical supervision of various programs being implemented by Conservation International in Peru including the consolidation of the bi-national Vilcabamba-Amboró Conservation Corridor, the implementation of a forest management project for indigenous communities in the Peruvian Central Amazon, the development of several REDD+ projects, and the provision of technical assistance on REDD+ readiness to the Peruvian Ministry of Environment.

    Maggie Comstock

    Senior Director, Climate Policy, Global Policy and Government Relations

    As the Senior Director of Climate Policy at Conservation International, Maggie Comstock leads the institution’s work to support nature-based solutions to climate mitigation and adaptation within global policy frameworks.​

    Johnson Cerda

    Director, DGM Global Executing Agency

    Johnson Cerda conducts research related to climate change, biodiversity and protected areas in Ecuador. Johnson is currently a member of the GEF/NGO Committee that represents the indigenous peoples of Latin America.

    Luis Barquin-Valle

    Managing Director, DGM Global Executing Agency

    Luis Barquin-Valle manages the Global Project of the Dedicated Grant Mechanism, a unique partnership and innovative model for climate finance in which indigenous peoples and local communities lead the design, implementation, and governance of efforts to enhance the role of communities in forests and climate action.

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