The Impact of Nature on Disease

Most pandemics start when disease jumps from animals to humans because humans get too close to natural ecosystems

Here are two critical actions we must take:

  • Stop the Illegal Wildlife Trade
  • Stop the Destruction of Nature

Most pandemics start when disease jumps from animals to humans because humans get too close to natural ecosystems. As forests are destroyed and oceans are overfished, animals and humans are more likely to get sick. These types of illnesses are known as zoonotic disease.

In the last 50 years, wildlife populations have declined by 60% and diseases that spread from animals to humans have quadrupled. The best way to prevent pandemics is to protect nature.

 

© Trond Larsen

 

More about the impact of the destruction of nature on disease

 

© Conservation International/photo by Bailey Evans

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