Intro Photo Large

Remove this module

Section Info

EditPhoto Title:Phoenix Islands Protected Area
EditPhoto Description:
EditImage Url:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_69672619.jpg
EditImage Description:Phoenix Islands Protected Area
EditPhoto Credit:© Keith A. Ellenbogen
EditPhoto RenditionID Small:5[Optional]
EditPhoto RenditionID Webkit:6[Optional]
EditPhoto RenditionID Medium:7[Optional]
EditPhoto RenditionID Portrait:8[Optional]
EditPhoto RenditionID Large:9[Optional]


Innovative partnerships are protecting one of Earth’s last remaining marine wilderness areas.

As one of the world’s most remote island chains, the Phoenix Islands — located within the Republic of Kiribati in the heart of the Pacific Ocean — comprise an island archipelago and ocean wilderness area of immense global value. One of Earth's last intact oceanic coral archipelago ecosystems, Kiribati’s eight islands boast unique coral reefs and globally-important bird populations. In fact, more than 120 species of coral and 514 species of reef fish have been identified (including several new species) with unique assemblages reflecting the islands’ remoteness in the central Pacific. The coral-reef-based ecosystem, unlike most of the reefs in the world today, is healthy with an abundance of key marine species seldom encountered elsewhere.

With a number of emerging threats, however, isolation can no longer be relied upon to conserve these islands. Vulnerability to climate change — including sea level rise and ocean acidification and warming — and increasing global pressure on tuna resources put the existence of the Phoenix Islands and the well-being of Kiribati’s people in jeopardy.


Our role

CI supported the Kiribati government’s 2006 declaration of the Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA), and since then, we have partnered in the design, establishment and implementation of the 408,250-square-kilometer protected area (157,626 square miles or about the size of California) — right in the midst of the world’s largest remaining tuna fishery. Since Kiribati first envisioned the PIPA, CI has supported a number of pivotal steps along the way to full implementation, including legal designation in 2008; the creation of a conservation trust in 2009; five scientific expeditions; designation as the world’s largest and deepest UNESCO World Heritage site in 2010; and restoration of three of the eight islands. We also continue to leverage partnerships and investment with the New England Aquarium and Kiribati’s leadership. The region’s first large-scale marine protected area, PIPA is recognized as the founding site in the Pacific Island Forum Leaders’ Pacific Oceanscape — and has generated a sea change in how we view our oceans.


Text Columns 2 or 3

Module Configuration

EditSection title:Our plan
EditSection subtitle:
EditNumber of Columns:medium--one-half2Note: Items will rearrange into rows and columns as needed depending on number of columns specified here.
    EditAnchor tag:[Optional]

    Column Items

    Column Item

    Edit Item Title:Management plan
    Edit Item Link:[Optional]
    Edit Item Text:CI and partners are currently supporting implementation of the PIPA’s first management plan (2010-2014) and have helped establish a local PIPA team in Kiribati to lead this work. The plan follows a phased approach and focuses on the core operation and capacity building needed, as well as on key strategic issues such as island restoration, fisheries management and tourism development. In the first phase, full protection of 80% of the island’s priority lagoon, reef and offshore areas has been achieved, an area of more than 12,000 square kilometers. A new management plan is in development for post-2014, and the PIPA will close to all commercial fishing at the end of 2014.
    Remove this item

    Column Item

    Edit Item Title:Conservation contract
    Edit Item Link:[Optional]
    Edit Item Text:To enable effective management of the PIPA and the conservation measures needed, the PIPA partnership has pioneered a market-based contractual approach, another global first for this large-scale marine protected area. The contract will go into effect on January 1, 2015, on the heels of the closure to all commercial fishing, another first for developing nations. This innovative contract reflects the strong partnership and long-term commitment CI has to the PIPA.
    Remove this item
    Add a Column Item
    Remove this module

    Text with Image or Video

    Remove this module

    Title

    EditHeader:
    EditAnchor tag for sticky nav:pipatrust[Optional]

    Sections

    Image and Text

    Edit Image Position: left Left
      Edit Section Title: Phoenix Islands Protected Area Trust
      Edit Section Title Style: h3 Green
        Edit Image URL: /SiteCollectionImages/ci_82082380.jpg
        Edit Image Description: Men in boat off coast of Kiribati. © Conservation International/photo by Peter Stonier
        Edit Text:

        Kiribati has few viable paths toward economic development given its lack of resources, small home market, limited infrastructure and remoteness from external markets. Like many other island nations, its wealth lies within its waters — all 3.5 million square kilometers (1.4 million square miles or an area roughly the size of India). Revenue from commercial fishing and licensing amount to almost half of its national income, and fishing fleets from South Korea, Japan, China, Taiwan and the United States pay licensing fees to operate in Kiribati’s territorial waters. However, due to its large span and limited monitoring capacity, Kiribati also loses untold millions of dollars of income per year from illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing in its surrounding ocean waters.

        With support from CI’s Global Conservation Fund (GCF), the PIPA partners (the Government of Kiribati, the New England Aquarium and CI) established the PIPA Conservation Trust, a non-governmental organization established under the laws of the Republic of Kiribati. Its primary objective is to provide long-term sustainable financing for the conservation of terrestrial and marine biodiversity in the PIPA. The trust is governed by its board of directors appointed by the PIPA partners. With contributions from GCF and the Government of Kiribati, the trust has an endowment of US$ 5 million and aims to add another US$ 8.5 million by 2015.

        Edit Link for Header and Image: [Optional]
        Edit Photo Credit: © Conservation International/photo by Peter Stonier
        Edit Photo RenditionID Medium: 31 [Optional]
        Edit Photo RenditionID Large: 9 [Optional]
        Add Image and TextAdd Video and TextAdd Image Thumbnail List

        ​Image with Text Overlay

        Image with Text Overlay Config

        EditAnchor Tag:[Optional]
        EditImage:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_97943076.jpg
        EditImage Alt Text:Off the coast of Kiribati.
        EditTitle:By the numbers
        EditSubtitle:>$4 million investment
        EditText:Since 2003, annual GCF grants totalling over US$ 4 million have provided a vital boost to the Phoenix Islands Protected Area Conservation Trust and partners.
        EditPhoto Credit:© Conservation International/photo by Peter Stonier
        Edit Layout:boxBox
           
          EditPhoto RenditionID Small:5[Optional]
          EditPhoto RenditionID Webkit:6[Optional]
          EditPhoto RenditionID Medium:7[Optional]
          EditPhoto RenditionID Portrait:8[Optional]
          EditPhoto RenditionID Large:9[Optional]
          Remove this module

          ​​Publication Carousel Tags

          Carousel Settings

          Edit Section Id:
          Edit Max. number of featured publications: 5
          EditTags{"CIGeography":{"Phoenix Islands":true}}
          Remove this module
          ​​

          ​​Video Carousel (medium, black background)

          Remove this module

          Section Information

          EditSection Title:
          EditSection Description:
          EditAnchor Tag:ciTemporaryId[Optional]
          EditVideo Page URL:/Pages/video.aspx[Optional]​
          EditRendition ID Medium:33[Optional]
          EditRendition ID Large:34[Optional]

          Videos

          Video Info

          EditYoutube Video ID:vqzVDf1K_IA/Pages/video.aspx?vid=vqzVDf1K_IA
          EditVideo Title:[Optional]
          EditCustom Thumbnail (overrides image from YouTube):/SiteCollectionImages/PacificOceanscapeScreenShot.png[Optional]
          EditImage Alt Text:
          Edit Autoplay:falseFalse

          Video Info

          EditYoutube Video ID:CEC-wa2gVOs/Pages/video.aspx?vid=CEC-wa2gVOs
          EditVideo Title:[Optional]
          EditCustom Thumbnail (overrides image from YouTube):/SiteCollectionImages/TongScreenShot.png[Optional]
          EditImage Alt Text:
          Edit Autoplay:falseFalse

          Video Info

          Delete Video
          EditYoutube Video ID:QTW6POwGtXs/Pages/video.aspx?vid=QTW6POwGtXs
          EditVideo Title:[Optional]
          EditCustom Thumbnail (overrides image from YouTube):/SiteCollectionImages/KevinIroScreenShot.png[Optional]
          EditImage Alt Text:
          Edit Autoplay:falseFalse

          Video Info

          Delete Video
          EditYoutube Video ID:OVqBjn4W6gM/Pages/video.aspx?vid=OVqBjn4W6gM
          EditVideo Title:[Optional]
          EditCustom Thumbnail (overrides image from YouTube):[Optional]
          EditImage Alt Text:
          Edit Autoplay:falseFalse
          Add Video
          ​​

          Text with Image or Video

          Remove this module

          Title

          EditHeader:From the blog
          EditAnchor tag for sticky nav:[Optional]

          Sections

          Image and Text List

          Delete Item

          Row

          Edit Section Heading:UNESCO declares Phoenix Islands Protected Area largest World Heritage Site
          Edit Image URL: /SiteCollectionImages/ci_10565734.jpg
          Edit Image Alt Text: Diver in the Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA)
          Edit Text: I’ve got some very good news to share. Thanks to many years of work by CI, Kiribati and partners, the Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA) was just inscribed as a World Heritage Site at the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) meeting in Brazil. PIPA is now the world’s largest World Heritage Site. - Read more »
          Edit Link for Header and Image:http://blog.conservation.org/2010/08/pipa-largest-world-heritage-site/[Optional]
          EditPhoto Credit:© Cat Holloway
          Edit Photo RenditionID Small:6[Optional]
          Edit Photo RenditionID Medium:7[Optional]

          Row

          Edit Section Heading:Honoring Amelia Earhart’s legacy in the Phoenix Islands
          Edit Image URL: http://blog.conservation.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/kiribati-beach.jpg
          Edit Image Alt Text: Lagoon on Fanning Island, Kiribati.
          Edit Text: I’m on my way from Samoa to the Cook Islands. If you look at a map, they’re not far apart — it’s two hours distance by plane — yet it will take me more than 24 hours to get there, as there is no direct route and I have to go through New Zealand (yes, I do carbon offsets for flights). I have taken hundreds of flights around the Pacific islands in the last 20 years — usually indirect and during the sleepy hours between midnight and dawn. It’s currently 1:45 a.m. and the plane is delayed until 3 a.m. — so here I am, writing. - Read more »
          Edit Link for Header and Image:http://blog.conservation.org/2012/08/honoring-amelia-earharts-legacy-in-the-phoenix-islands/[Optional]
          EditPhoto Credit:© Lidian Neeleman
          Edit Photo RenditionID Small:6[Optional]
          Edit Photo RenditionID Medium:7[Optional]

          Row

          Edit Section Heading:Phoenix Islands: The Holy Grail of the Ocean
          Edit Image URL: /SiteCollectionImages/ci_20556018.jpg
          Edit Image Alt Text: Scuba diving in the Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA)
          Edit Text:

          I’ve been a scientific explorer for most of my adult life, and this work has taken me all over the world. I’ve made over 7,000 dives in every sea on Earth, explored depths of 18,000 feet in submersibles, and even lived underwater for 30 days in a specialized habitat..

          About 10 years ago I was asked to lead a scientific expedition to the remote Phoenix Islands, one island group of the Republic of Kiribati in the central Pacific, five days from anywhere. At that time these islands had never been dived, so this was a once in a lifetime opportunity, and one that proved to be a turning point for me, both personally and professionally. - Read more »

          Edit Link for Header and Image:http://blog.conservation.org/2010/12/phoenix-islands-holy-grail-of-the-ocean/[Optional]
          EditPhoto Credit:© Cat Holloway
          Edit Photo RenditionID Small:6[Optional]
          Edit Photo RenditionID Medium:7[Optional]
          Add row
          Add Image and TextAdd Video and TextAdd Image Thumbnail List


          More of Our Work Links

          Remove this module

          Section Configuration

          EditAnchor tag for sticky nav:[Optional]
          EditImage RenditionID Small:21[Optional]
          EditImage RenditionID Webkit:22[Optional]
          EditImage RenditionID Medium:23[Optional]
          EditImage RenditionID Webkit Medium:24[Optional]
          EditImage RenditionID Large:25[Optional]
          EditImage RenditionID Webkit Large:26[Optional]

          First Image

          EditTitle:Pacific Oceanscape
          EditImage:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_63002536.jpg
          EditLink:/where/Pages/Pacific-Oceanscape.aspx
          EditImage Alt Text:Aerial view, Bora Bora. © Rodolphe Holler

          Second Image

          EditTitle:Working with Governments
          EditImage:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_12892312.jpg
          EditLink:/How/Pages/Working-with-Governments.aspx
          EditImage Alt Text:Flags from all over the world. © Brasil2

          Third Image

          EditTitle:The Ocean
          EditImage:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_16084886.jpg
          EditLink:/what/Pages/oceans.aspx
          EditImage Alt Text:Coral reef in Viti Levu, Fiji, Oceania. © William Crosse