Bikepacking for Conservation Program

Connecting with nature through cycling

© 2020 Logan Watts

 

The Bikepacking for Conservation Program is a pilot project that aims to harness the power of cycling to support nature conservation. Low-impact, self-driven and sustainable, bikepacking combines mountain biking and minimalist backpacking and this project identified scenic routes through ecologically important areas to connect people to the nature on which we depend.

 

Route-building 

In February 2020, Conservation International and partners including Bikepacking.com, Wahoo and others developed a 5-to-7-day bikepacking loop starting and ending in Bogotá. The route, named Ruta Chingaza for Colombia’s Chingaza National Natural Park, connects the city to the rural communities and high montane ecosystems surrounding it.

Chingaza National Natural Park is currently closed to cyclists, but Conservation International is collaborating with park authorities to make cycling a part of the park’s tourism strategy. Considering the global pandemic, cycling experiences (including bikepacking) in the park will be permitted again once it is safe — hopefully sometime in 2021.

© 2020 Rugile Kaladyte

Support Conservation

Around the world, Conservation International is leading innovative conservation programs to help protect the nature we all need to thrive.

 

More about the route

Protecting nature to protect water

The native páramos ecosystem that surrounds the city of Bogotá provides and regulates the water supply for more than 10 million people in the region. Conservation International is working to secure formal commitments from the water utility, regional and local environmental authorities, the business community and municipal governments to implement a sustainable watershed business plan that would protect, restore and manage 378,000 hectares of páramos and other critical ecosystems, such as Andean jungle and foothill plains.

Conservation International is also partnering with local farmers to support sustainable agricultural practices that reduce watershed impacts while maximizing their incomes. 

 

In February, legendary ultra-endurance cyclist Lael Wilcox, Joe Cruz, and the filmmaker Rugile Kaladyte traveled to the Colombian capital of Bogota, in partnership with Conservation International, Wahoo, and Bikepacking.com, to launch the Bikepacking for Conservation Program. The project was designed to explore and scout a bikepacking route that would connect the bustling metropolis of Bogota with rural communities and the Chingaza National Park. The resulting route -- Ruta Chingaza -- will help cyclists connect to nature and better understand the ecosystems upon which life and livelihoods in this area depend. Chingaza National Natural Park is currently closed to cyclists, but Conservation International is collaborating with park authorities to make cycling a part of the park’s tourism strategy, and anticipate that cycling experiences (including bikepacking) will be permitted by sometime in 2021, though it is hard to anticipate when exactly due to COVID-19. Please do not travel to the park at this time Film shot and edited by Rugile Kaladyte Partners: Bikepacking.com Conservation International Komoot Pearl Izumi Wheels Manufacturing Riders: Lael Wilcox Logan Watts Joe Cruz Nathalia Penton Eliot Wuhrmann Adam Charles Smith Subscribe to the Wahoo Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/wahoofitness?sub_confirmation=1 Check out the Ruta Chingaza route here: https://bikepacking.com/routes/ruta-chingaza/

In early 2020, legendary ultra-endurance cyclist Lael Wilcox, Joe Cruz, and the filmmaker Rugile Kaladyte traveled to the Colombian capital of Bogota, in partnership with Conservation International, Wahoo, and Bikepacking.com, to launch the Bikepacking for Conservation Program.

Learn more about the route on bikepacking.com.

 

© 2020 Rugile Kaladyte

Cycling as a sustainable tourism strategy 

The Ruta Chingaza has strong potential to stimulate the development of cycling tourism in the Bogota region, where cycling is growing in popularity. Many areas along the route have limited infrastructure and are difficult to access even by car. Mountain and gravel bikes can more easily reach these places and improve the potential for rural tourism. Bikepacking requires less infrastructure than many types of tourism, and rural communities can benefit from the development of small-scale, sustainable ecotourism businesses for cyclists.