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EditPhoto Title:Farmers Reap Benefits of Improved Grazing Practices
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EditImage Url:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_62812270.jpg
EditImage Description:Old women bringing in the sheep and goats
EditPhoto Credit:© Tessa Mildenhall
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Farmers in the South African region of Namaqualand​ produce some of the finest quality lamb in the country, but they face water scarcity and land degradation that may be exacerbated by climate change.


Erosion, overgrazed land and plowed wetlands are common in this region, where sporadic rainfall and a semi-arid climate make existing wetlands​ vital to local people. Also relying on the wetlands are many plant species found nowhere else. Now, through conservation agreements — under which farmers agree to protect their natural resources and the services they provide in exchange for tangible benefits —​ South African livestock farmers are improving land management practices to help secure scarce water supplies, unique wildflower species and their own farming future.



Our role

In 2009, Conservation South Africa (CSA) and CI’s Conservation Stewards Program (CSP) initiated the Biodiversity and Red Meat Initiative (BRI), through which farmers commit to sustainable approaches to grazing, water management, stock numbers and predator control. In return, they get higher prices for their stock and other benefits.



Our p​lan

Through conservation agreements, farmers have improved their management of more than 12,000 hectares (more than 29,000 acres), enhancing the long-term outlook for their own operations and the overall health of the ecosystem. Meanwhile, Conservation South Africa facilitates the sale of stock at attractive prices, funds water pump maintenance and provides employment for local monitoring officials who assist farmers in implementing sustainable grazing and monitoring regimes. The farmers also receive training in fire, farm and wetland management as well as non-lethal predator control.

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EditImage Alt Text:Landscape with wild flowers and quiver trees in Namaqualand, South Africa.
EditTitle:By the numbers
EditSubtitle:12,100 hectares protected
EditText:Through conservation agreements, farmers have protected or improved management of 12,100 hectares (29,899 acres), enhancing the long-term outlook for their own operations and the health of the ecosystem.
EditPhoto Credit:© Nico Smit
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    EditTitle:Climate
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    EditLink:/what/Pages/Climate.aspx
    EditImage Alt Text:Night falls over Rio de Janeiro. © Nikada

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    EditTitle:Science and Innovation
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    EditImage Alt Text:Scientists set a camera trap. © Benjamin Drummond

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    EditTitle:The Ocean
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    EditImage Alt Text:Coral reef in Viti Levu, Fiji, Oceania. © William Crosse