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EditPhoto Title:Amazonia
EditPhoto Description:The world’s greatest rainforest is also one of its most vital life-support systems — and it is under threat.
EditImage Url:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_62030251.jpg
EditImage Description:Essequibo River, Guyana.
EditPhoto Credit:© Pete Oxford/iLCP
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EditSection TitleThe Amazon rainforest, by the numbers
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EditSection ID (Anchor Tag):overview[Optional]

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EditCircle color:fact--green    
EditCircle icon:icon-chimp
EditResult value:10%
EditResult field:of the world’s known species
EditText:The Amazon forest hosts the richest biodiversity of any ecosystem on the planet.

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EditCircle color:fact--green    
EditCircle icon:icon-water
EditResult value:20%
EditResult field:of the world’s fresh water supply
EditText:The Amazon River system also supplies hydropower for millions of people.

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EditCircle color:fact--green    
EditCircle icon:icon-people
EditResult value:30 million
EditResult field:people live in the Amazon basin
EditText:Amazonia is home to as many people as Tokyo, Mexico City and New York City combined.
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The vast Amazon River basin of South America is rapidly losing forests and habitat​ — nearly 6,000 square kilometers (3,600 square miles) of forests were lost in 2015 in the Brazilian Amazon alone. If this continues, humanity faces the irrevocable loss of one of the great harbors of biodiversity, fresh water and climate resilience — forests provide 30 percent of the solution to climate change.

The next five years are critically important for Amazonia. Increasing global demand for resources risks further deforestation that places the Amazon region, its people and the world at risk. With this in mind, Conservation International (CI) and its partners is pursuing an ambitious strategy to sustain nature in Amazonia so it can continue to sustain us all.


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    EditItem Title:The challenge
    EditItem Link:[Optional]
    EditItem Text:Agricultural expansion, road development and extractive industries are unnecessarily destroying the forests of the Amazon and the services they provide (such as water supply and carbon storage). Human activities have already removed 10% of the Amazon rainforest, an area twice the size of Texas.
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    EditItem Title:The goal
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    EditItem Text:Conservation International’s goal: to achieve zero net deforestation in Amazonia by 2020 to protect essential resources, mitigate climate change and increase prosperity for people.
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    Call to Action Centered (single)

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    EditCall to Action Title:People need forests like the Amazon
    EditCall to Action Description:You can protect an acre of forest for $25 to help create a healthier, more productive planet.
    EditCall to Action Button Description:Protect an acre
    EditCall to Action Button Link:https://secure2.convio.net/cintl/site/Donation2?df_id=10265&mfc_pref=T&10265.donation=form1
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    EditAnchor Tag:strategy[Optional]
    EditImage:/SiteCollectionImages/maps/Amazonia_traffic-light.jpg
    EditImage Alt Text:
    EditTitle:CI’s strategy
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    EditText:

    In this map, Amazonia is divided into three “zones”: Green, yellow and red.

    • Green Zone: The approximately 45% of Amazonia that is comprised of forest formally designated as protected areas or indigenous lands and territories.
    • Yellow Zone: The estimated 46% of Amazonia that is currently mostly forest, for which use (or protection) has not yet been formally defined.
    • Red Zone: The remaining 9% of Amazonia has already been converted to agriculture, developed into cities, or degraded to meet demand for food, homes, power and jobs.

    Through 2020, CI will pursue a three-pronged approach to stop net deforestation in Amazonia.

    EditPhoto Credit:Map is simplified for communication purposes © Conservation International
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    ​​

    CI’s solutions

    How will we do it?

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    EditImage Position:leftLeft
      EditSection Title:1. Strengthen and expand the Green Zone
      EditSection Title Style:h3Green
        EditImage URL:/sitecollectionimages/ci_14509324.jpg
        EditImage Description:Amapá State Forest, Brazil
        EditText:Approximately 44% of Amazonia falls within the “Green Zone,” where CI will help to consolidate and strengthen management of existing protected areas and indigenous lands and territories. Even in these protected areas, to date 3% of their forests have already been deforested. CI will emphasize the income-generating potential of protected areas (such as ecotourism and trust funds), while promoting sustainable development, benefit sharing and conflict resolution for lasting conservation.
        EditLink for Header and Image:[Optional]
        EditPhoto Credit:© Adriano Gambarini
        EditPhoto RenditionID Medium:31[Optional]
        EditPhoto RenditionID Large:9[Optional]
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        EditImage Position:leftLeft
          EditSection Title:2. Avoid deforestation in the Yellow Zone
          EditSection Title Style:h3Green
            EditImage URL:/sitecollectionimages/ci_32628225.jpg
            EditImage Description:Saltwater lakes in southern Pantanal, Brazil
            EditText:The most at-risk zone, the “Yellow Zone” is the front line for turning the tide of destruction, as it encompasses large areas of relatively pristine forest not yet designated for protection — or for production. CI’s approach includes establishing new protected areas and indigenous lands and territories; expanding programs that encourage people to protect their forests by giving them economic benefits; increasing access to climate financing for zero deforestation; and promoting adoption of natural capital accounting as a framework for long-term sustainable development.
            EditLink for Header and Image:[Optional]
            EditPhoto Credit:© Luciano Candisani/iLCP
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            EditImage Position:leftLeft
              EditSection Title:3. Increase sustainable production in the Red Zone
              EditSection Title Style:h3Green
                EditImage URL:/sitecollectionimages/ci_84210542.jpg
                EditImage Description:Kayapo women working, Brazil
                EditText:In the “Red Zone,” where Amazonia’s forests have already been lost or heavily degraded, CI will promote sustainable agriculture and smart development planning to reduce poverty and minimize the impact of infrastructure and mineral extraction — two of the main drivers of deforestation in these more densely populated areas. From securing private-sector commitments on deforestation-free supply chains to integrating biodiversity and ecosystem management into infrastructure and extractive development, CI aims to prevent further forest loss.
                EditLink for Header and Image:[Optional]
                EditPhoto Credit:© Cristina Mittermeier
                EditPhoto RenditionID Medium:31[Optional]
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                CI’s projects in the Amazon

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                Image

                EditImage URL:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_29685988.jpg
                EditImage Alt Text:Mountains in Calha Norte, Brazil. © Adriano Gambarini
                EditCaption Title:Protecting the Heart of the Amazon in Calha Norte, Brazil
                EditCaption Description:The large, remote area of intact forest in northern Brazil is especially resilient to climate change — so protecting its plentiful water and other natural resources must happen in tandem with sustainable development.
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                EditLink URL:/projects/Pages/Protecting-Heart-of-the-Amazon-in-Calha-Norte-Brazil.aspx
                EditLink Text:Read More

                Image

                EditImage URL:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_90849779.jpg
                EditImage Alt Text:© Cristina Mittermeier
                EditCaption Title:Brazil’s Kayapó: Stewards of the Forest
                EditCaption Description:Indigenous territories and other protected areas are some of the most valuable places in the Amazon, giving us food, water and the air we breathe. CI works to promote better management, design and financing for these territories — so they can continue to benefit people for generations to come.
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                EditLink URL:/projects/Pages/kayapo-stewards-of-the-forests-brazil.aspx
                EditLink Text:Read More
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                Image

                EditImage URL:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_72841958.jpg
                EditImage Alt Text:Woman peeling cassava in Guyana. © Pete Oxford/iLCP
                EditCaption Title:Supporting Low-carbon Livelihoods in Guyana
                EditCaption Description:To secure a sustainable future for Guyana, we are working to improve livelihoods in the ecologically sensitive Rupununi region through natural resource management.
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                EditLink URL:/projects/Pages/supporting-low-carbon-livelihoods-in-guyana.aspx
                EditLink Text:Read More
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                EditImage URL:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_15980416.jpg
                EditImage Alt Text:Sunrise in the Pampas, Bolivia. © Jonathan Hood
                EditCaption Title:Creating Healthy Sustainable Societies in Bolivia
                EditCaption Description:Bolivia has one of the highest rates of deforestation in the world — now new development of roads and other infrastructure could increase pressure on the country’s vast natural resources.
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                EditLink URL:/projects/pages/creating-healthy-sustainable-societies-in-bolivia.aspx
                EditLink Text:Read More
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                Image

                EditImage URL:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_16600245.jpg
                EditImage Alt Text:Boys doing cartwheels in Bahia, Brazil. © Cristina Mittermeier
                EditCaption Title:Bolsa Verde: Improving Livelihoods and Conserving Forests
                EditCaption Description:The Bolsa Verde program aims to promote conservation of Brazil’s important ecosystems and simultaneously improve livelihoods for people living in extreme poverty — the condition for nearly 17% of the population in the Amazon region.
                [Optional]
                EditLink URL:/projects/Pages/Bolsa-Verde-brazil-Improving-Livelihoods-and-Conserving-Forests.aspx
                EditLink Text:Read More
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                EditImage URL:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_55108398.jpg
                EditImage Alt Text:Essequibo River, Guyana. © Pete Oxford/iLCP
                EditCaption Title:Amapá: A New Development Model for the Amazon
                EditCaption Description:Amapá is home to Brazil’s largest area of protected tropical forests — but social and economic development must occur alongside conservation.
                [Optional]
                EditLink URL:/projects/Pages/amapa-new-development-model-for-the-amazon.aspx
                EditLink Text:Read More

                Image

                EditImage URL:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_26635787.jpg
                EditImage Alt Text:Santa Cruz highland forest. © Will Turner
                EditCaption Title:Economic Incentives to Protect Ecuador’s Forests
                EditCaption Description:Families and indigenous communities are receiving direct economic incentives to conserve their native forests. The program is alleviating poverty for thousands of Ecuadorians.
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                EditLink URL:/projects/pages/Economic-Incentives-to-Protect-Ecuadors-Forests-socio-bosque.aspx
                EditLink Text:Read More

                Image

                EditImage URL:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_66112480.jpg
                EditImage Alt Text:Tayrona National Park, El Cabo San Juan. © Christopher Schoenbohm
                EditCaption Title:Adapting to a Changing Climate in Colombia
                EditCaption Description:The water, coasts and mountains of Colombia directly benefit 80% of the population — and are critical to protecting against climate change impacts.
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                EditLink URL:/projects/Pages/Adapting-to-a-Changing-Climate-in-Colombia.aspx
                EditLink Text:Read More
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                EditImage URL:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_47283891.JPG
                EditImage Alt Text:People working in a tree nursery in the Alto Mayo Protected Forest. © Thomas Muller
                EditCaption Title:Developing a Sustainable Economy in San Martín, Peru
                EditCaption Description:CI and the San Martín regional government's collaborative work is leading the path toward a new sustainable economic development model for Peru.
                EditRead More Link:/projects/pages/developing-a-sustainable-economy-in-san-martin-peru.aspx[Optional]
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                From the blog​

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                EditImage URL:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_26804767.jpg
                EditImage Alt Text:Cloud forest in Ecuador
                EditCaption Title:To fight deforestation, one country changed the equation
                EditCaption Description:A program in Ecuador provides direct economic incentives to landowners and rural communities who voluntarily commit to protecting forests.
                EditRead More Text:Read More
                EditRead More Link:http://blog.conservation.org/2015/11/to-fight-deforestation-one-country-changed-the-equation/[Optional]
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                EditImage URL:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_81231209.jpg
                EditImage Alt Text:Norbil Becerra stands among his coffee plants in northeastern Peru.
                EditCaption Title:Illegal logger turned forest champion — with help from hummingbirds
                EditCaption Description:Norbil Becerra once knew only one way to make a living: cutting down trees for illegal logging companies in the Peruvian Amazon, a 12-hour walk from his family in Peru’s northeastern San Martín region. Now, Becerra provides for his wife and three children in a way that keeps Peru’s trees standing.
                EditRead More Text:Read More
                EditRead More Link:http://blog.conservation.org/2016/01/illegal-logger-turned-forest-champion-with-help-from-hummingbirds/[Optional]
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                EditImage URL:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_65968704.jpg
                EditImage Alt Text:Aerial view of Xingu National Park, Brazil
                EditCaption Title:Halt in construction of Brazilian dam sign of progress on indigenous rights
                EditCaption Description:Last week the Brazilian government suspended the licensing process for the São Luiz do Tapajós dam, halting construction on the country’s second-largest hydroelectric facility over concerns that the dam may violate the rights of several Munduruku indigenous communities.
                EditRead More Text:Read More
                EditRead More Link:http://blog.conservation.org/2016/04/halt-in-construction-of-brazilian-dam-sign-of-progress-on-indigenous-rights/[Optional]
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                EditImage URL:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_18507876.jpg
                EditImage Alt Text:Shrimp ponds replace a section of rice paddies in the San Martín Region of Peru. The water from the ponds is cycled into the paddies downhill, conserving water and reducing the need for fertilizers.
                EditCaption Title:From rice to shrimp: How one unlikely crustacean is helping to save the Amazon
                EditCaption Description:Around the world, shrimp farms are getting a bad rap: Widespread destruction of mangrove forests that protect villages from storms. Inefficient water use. Disease. Yet in the Peruvian rainforest, CI and partners are changing the way shrimp is raised — and helping farmers produce more food without clearing more trees.
                EditRead More Text:Read More
                EditRead More Link:http://blog.conservation.org/2015/09/from-rice-to-shrimp-how-one-unlikely-crustacean-is-helping-to-save-the-amazon/[Optional]
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                EditImage URL:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_82417551.jpg
                EditImage Alt Text:Indigenous man in traditional dress in Suriname
                EditCaption Title:New Conservation Corridor Latest Environmental Triumph for Suriname
                EditCaption Description:Thanks to work by CI in close collaboration with WWF and the Amazon Conservation Team, the Trio and Wayana indigenous communities have now declared an indigenous Southern Suriname Conservation Corridor (SSCC) covering 7.2 million hectares (17.8 million acres).
                EditRead More Text:Read More
                EditRead More Link:http://blog.conservation.org/2015/04/new-conservation-corridor-latest-environmental-triumph-for-suriname/[Optional]
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                EditImage URL:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_48226493.jpg
                EditImage Alt Text:Braulio Andrade, CI Peru administrative contract manager, shows off CI's Iris+ drone to Melanio Perez, who benefits from CI's conservation agreement program.
                EditCaption Title:Low-flying, crime-sniffing drones: Coming soon to the Amazon?
                EditCaption Description:Officially known as “unmanned aerial vehicles,” drones are being used to perform a number of environmental tasks: There are drone rangers and drone firefighters, and by the end of 2015, there may be drones capable of planting up to 36,000 trees a day.
                EditRead More Text:Read More
                EditRead More Link:http://blog.conservation.org/2015/10/low-flying-crime-sniffing-drones-coming-soon-to-the-amazon/[Optional]
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                ​Email Signup Centered

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                Video Section

                Edit Section Title:Watch
                Edit Section subtitle:Can you actually make money from keeping forests standing? In the Amazon, Guyana is showing the world how it can be done.
                Edit Video ID:twa835SItow
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                Edit Video Page URL:/pages/video.aspx
                Edit Video image alt text:Video: Guyana’s Green Gold: Keeping Forests Standing
                Edit Background image:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_15973254.jpg
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                Edit Section Title:Shop smart
                Edit Section subtitle:Support companies that sell responsibly harvested wood.
                Edit Button link:/pages/what-you-can-do-tips.aspx#shop-smart
                Edit Button text:Learn more
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                EditPage Link:http://ci-intl.org/1OvZkfY
                EditTweet Text:Red, yellow, green, but what does it mean? @ConservationOrg has an ambitious strategy to sustain nature in Amazonia.
                EditTwitter Page Link:http://www.conservation.org/where/pages/amazonia.aspx
                EditLinkedin Title:Red, yellow, green, but what does it mean? Conservation International has an ambitious strategy to sustain nature in Amazonia.
                EditShow Counters?truetrue
                   
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                  More of Our Work Links

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                  First Image

                  EditTitle:Science and Innovation
                  EditImage: /SiteCollectionImages/ci_80568511.tif
                  EditLink:/science
                  EditImage Alt Text: Badru Mugerwa, Lawrence Tumugabirwe and Aventino Nkwasibwe. © Benjamin Drummond

                  Second Image

                  EditTitle:Mapping Natural Capital
                  EditImage: /SiteCollectionImages/ci_86647522.jpg
                  EditLink:/naturalcapital
                  EditImage Alt Text:Jonathan Dabo, Gabriel Appiah and Benson Owusu discuss fieldwork plans at CSIR headquarters. © Benjamin Drummond

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                  EditTitle:Partnering with Communities
                  EditImage:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_20109105.jpg
                  EditLink:/communities
                  EditImage Alt Text:Women sell traditional crafts, Konashen Community-Owned Conservation Area in the Konashen Indigenous District, Southern Guyana. © Piotr Naskrecki
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