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EditPhoto Title:Protecting Mexico’s valuable water forest
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EditImage Url:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_29780970.jpg
EditImage Description:Lagunas de Zempoala National Park, Mexico
EditPhoto Credit:© Jessica Scranton
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Mexico’s Bosque de Agua — or Water Forest — provides 70% of the water needs for more than 23 million people. It is vitally important, but it’s under threat.

Located a few kilometers from the Mexico City, the Water Forest stretches across 250,000 hectares (over 600,000 acres), providing a home to rural and indigenous communities and it supports an outstanding number of endemic species. The forest provides clean air and food, and stabilizes the local climate by preventing erosion and landslides and mitigating drought.

But a growing population means more demand for land, and more potential for unsustainable and uncontrolled logging, agriculture and mining. Over the past 40 years, 35% of the forest cover has been lost.



Our role

With funding from the Gonzalo Rio Arronte, government, land owners, farmers, environmental groups and academics in the states of Mexico, Morelos and Mexico City are working together to protect the Water Forest and the welfare of the people who live in the region.

CI is helping three pilot communities implement the Water Forest strategy, which includes developing plans for forest and livestock management, providing conservation training, ensuring that public policy is in line with forest conservation objectives and promoting responsible attitudes about forest conservation through communication campaigns and social marketing.


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EditImage Alt Text:Coateteleco Lake, Mexico. The lake receives its water from the Water Forest
EditTitle:By the numbers
EditSubtitle:US$ 30 billion
EditText:A recent study by the National Institute of Ecology and Climate Change estimated the replacement cost of water from the Water Forest to supply the current demand at US$ 30 billion.
EditPhoto Credit:© Jessica Scranton
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    First Image

    EditTitle:Climate
    EditImage:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_30785027.jpg
    EditLink:/what/Pages/Climate.aspx
    EditImage Alt Text:Night falls over Rio de Janeiro. © Nikada
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    EditTitle:Science and Innovation
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    EditImage Alt Text:Scientists set a camera trap. © Benjamin Drummond
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    EditTitle:The Ocean
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    EditImage Alt Text:Coral reef in Viti Levu, Fiji, Oceania. © William Crosse
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