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EditPhoto Title:Conservation and peace
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EditImage Description:Calapa seedling
EditPhoto Credit:© Benjamin Drummond
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Where humans use land or natural resources in incompatible ways, conflict can arise. Where there is human conflict, nature loses.

The stakes for nature are high: Many of the world’s conflict zones are in places where biodiversity is highest.

Conservation cannot happen without peace, but the role of nature itself in helping to broker peace is often overlooked. This is where Conservation International (CI) is leading the way. Through its Policy Center for Environment and Peace, CI is committed to fostering nature’s role in resolving conflict — for nature’s well-being and our own.

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EditResult value:81%
EditResult field:of conflicts
EditText:Between 1950 and 2000, 81 percent of conflicts took place wholly or partially within biodiversity hotspots.

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    EditResult value:40%
    EditResult field:violent conflicts between countries
    EditText:In 2009, about 40 percent of violent conflicts between countries were linked to natural resources.

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      EditResult value:> 40%
      EditResult field:all conflicts within countries
      EditText:In the past 60 years, at least 40 percent of all conflicts within countries have a link to natural resources.
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      EditImage Alt Text:Azman harvests oil palm fruit near Pasoh Forest Reserve.
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      EditText:In a few decades, the relationship between the environment, resources and conflict may seem almost as obvious as the connection we see today between human rights, democracy and peace.
      — Wangari Maathai
      EditPhoto Credit:© Benjamin Drummond
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        CI’s role

        Our peacebuilding team works across CI’s field offices to integrate awareness of human rights into conservation to help create stability in places affected by conflict Through our work, we provide a range of tools for peacebuilding such as land-use planning and community-based natural resource management — creating space for dialogue, cooperation and collaborative decision-making over natural resources. We encourage best practices in environmental peacebuilding based on a “rights-based approach,” which promotes good governance and allows for participation of all.

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          EditSection Title:Africa
          EditSection Title Style:h3Green
            EditImage URL:/sitecollectionimages/ci_68351570.jpg
            EditImage Description:Borwen looking over East NImba Nature Reserve.
            EditText:In Liberia’s East Nimba Nature Reserve (ENNR), CI is using conservation agreements, a model in which communities receive benefits in return for undertaking specific conservation activities. The conservation agreements help to resolve disputes between government authorities managing the reserve and local people who use the forest for their livelihoods but who were not engaged when the reserve was established. Through the agreements, the ENNR is protected in return for investments in community health, education, infrastructure and jobs. CI is working to expand the program as a model for sustainable development across Liberia.
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            EditPhoto Credit: © Conservation International/photo by Bailey Evans
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              EditSection Title:Asia
              EditSection Title Style:h3Green
                EditImage URL:/sitecollectionimages/ci_90341542.jpg
                EditImage Description:Woman carries basket of food
                EditText:Since 2010, CI has been working with three conflict-affected communities in Timor-Leste’s Nino Konis Santana National Park to establish the first model of co-management for natural resources. Using tools to ensure that decision-making processes are inclusive and effectively promoting human rights, CI is working to improve management of the park in order to boost local food security, fight climate change and improve livelihoods for local people. The process has helped reduce local conflict and foster collaboration.
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                EditPhoto Credit: © World Wildlife Fund, Inc. / Tory Read
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                  EditSection Title:South America
                  EditSection Title Style:h3Green
                    EditImage URL:/sitecollectionimages/ci_94469874.jpg
                    EditImage Description:Inka Trail, Peru
                    EditText:In the contested Cordillera del Cóndor region between Peru and Ecuador, CI partnered with government and scientists to conduct a rapid assessment survey that confirmed the biological significance of the trans-boundary mountain range. This independent, third-party research helped put conservation on the peacebuilding agenda in this region. In 2002, the two governments signed a treaty to create a network of protected areas that called for coordination between national environmental and diplomatic authorities, as well as the strengthening of indigenous organizations and their governance mechanisms.
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                    EditPhoto Credit:© Luana Luna
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                    EditImage URL:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_94245274.jpg
                    EditImage Alt Text:Buddhist monks in Bhutan
                    EditCaption Title:3 Ways Conservation Efforts Can Promote Peace
                    EditCaption Description:From greenhouse gas-induced climate change to the rapid depletion of fisheries to dwindling freshwater supplies, the natural environment is increasingly linked to global conflict and insecurity.
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                    EditRead More Link:http://blog.conservation.org/2014/11/3-ways-conservation-efforts-can-promote-peace/[Optional]
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                    EditImage URL:/SiteCollectionImages/Press%20Releases/2015_BertaCaceres_homepage.jpg
                    EditImage Alt Text:Berta Caceres at the banks of the Gualcarque River in western Honduras, where she led a prolonged protest against construction on the Agua Zarca hydroelectric project, which poses grave threats to the local environment, river and indigenous Lenca people. She was murdered in her home in March 2016.
                    EditCaption Title:Murders of environmental activists reflect chronic clashes over resource use
                    EditCaption Description:Berta Cáceres, a Honduran environmental activist, spent years fighting to protect her community’s traditional lands.
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                    EditRead More Link:http://blog.conservation.org/2016/03/murders-of-environmental-activists-reflect-chronic-clashes-over-resource-use/[Optional]
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                    EditImage Alt Text:Man with children in Liberia
                    EditCaption Title:Environmental Peacebuilding: Conservation Agreements Reduce People-park Conflict in Liberia
                    EditCaption Description:As the country continues to recover from a civil war (and, more recently, the deadly Ebola outbreak), CI is working with the government and communities to ensure that local people are empowered to protect and benefit from the natural ecosystems on which they depend.
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                    EditRead More Link:http://blog.conservation.org/2015/02/environmental-peacebuilding-conservation-agreements-reduce-people-park-conflict-in-liberia/[Optional]
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                    EditImage Alt Text:Girl sits amongst crops near Gunung National Forest, Indonesia
                    EditCaption Title:Are Wildlife Declines Fueling Slavery and Armed Conflict?
                    EditCaption Description: Wildlife and fisheries are the primary means of putting protein on the table for more than a billion people. They are the key to livelihoods for many of the world’s poorest people, and the direct source of more than US$ 400 billion in trade annually.
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                    EditImage Alt Text:Corona Falls, Guyana
                    EditCaption Title:Water Shortages May Escalate Conflict Between Countries
                    EditCaption Description:Conflict over water resources is not a new phenomenon. People have competed for access to clean water for themselves, their animals and crops since time immemorial, particularly in dry areas of the world.
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                    EditImage Alt Text:Harrison Ford, Peter Seligmann, and Richard Haass at the CFR/CI symposium.
                    EditCaption Title:4 Ways Dwindling Natural Resources Could Lead to Conflict
                    EditCaption Description:Less than a decade ago off the Somali coast, pirates captured the world’s attention. However, despite extensive news coverage, many stories failed to emphasize one of the root causes of this surge of pirate attacks: overfishing of some of the Indian Ocean’s most productive waters.
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                    EditImage Alt Text:Portrait, woman and her children
                    EditCaption Title:Reconnecting with nature in the shadow of war
                    EditCaption Description:Over several centuries, the people of Timor-Leste have experienced prolonged periods of war and armed conflict. This history consciously or unconsciously shapes the way in which we Timorese relate to one another and to the natural resources upon which we depend for food and livelihoods.
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                    EditImage Alt Text:Red-crowned Crane (Grus japonensis)
                    EditCaption Title:Hope for Conservation and Peace in the Korean Demilitarized Zone
                    EditCaption Description:It’s the most heavily militarized border in the world — a strip of land 248 km (155 miles) long and 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) wide that is fenced with barbed wire and in some parts still contains land mines.
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                    EditImage URL:/SiteCollectionImages/ci_61683385.jpg
                    EditImage Alt Text:Mountain stream in a tropical rain forest.
                    EditCaption Title:Policy Center for Environment and Peace
                    EditCaption Description:Our lives are inextricably linked to the health of our planet. Conflicts over scarce and degraded natural resources are widespread. Conservation International's Policy Center for Environment and Peace was created to help address these conflicts.
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                    EditImage Alt Text:Malagasy farmer
                    EditCaption Title:Conservaton Stewards Program
                    EditCaption Description:CI’s Conservation Stewards Program (CSP) works with communities who agree to protect their natural resources, as well as the benefits they provide, in exchange for a steady stream of compensation from investors.
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                    EditImage Alt Text: Women carry water from a tributary of the Volta River near Nabogu. Though it's a longer walk, they prefer river over well water because it's less salty.
                    EditCaption Title:Respecting human rights in conservation
                    EditCaption Description:Every person on Earth has the right to food, water and a healthy environment — and to participate in decisions that affect their lives.
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                    EditRead More Link:/How/Pages/Respecting-human-rights-in-conservation.aspx[Optional]
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                    EditImage Alt Text: Local residents in the Bunduki Gap region of Morogoro in Tanzania.
                    EditCaption Title:Men and women: Partners in conservation
                    EditCaption Description:Men and women alike rely heavily on natural resources to provide households with food, fuel and water — but gender roles and culture are often overlooked in conservation efforts.
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                    EditRead More Link:/how/pages/gender-and-conservation.aspx[Optional]
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                      EditTitle:Climate
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                      EditLink:/what/Pages/Climate.aspx
                      EditImage Alt Text:Night falls over Rio de Janeiro. © Nikada
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                      EditTitle:Science and Innovation
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                      EditImage Alt Text:Scientists set a camera trap. © Benjamin Drummond
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                      EditTitle:The Ocean
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                      EditLink:/what/Pages/oceans.aspx
                      EditImage Alt Text:Coral reef in Viti Levu, Fiji, Oceania. © William Crosse
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