​How the BGNP Rangers Protect Forest

Indonesia​   English


When we hear the word 'police', the first thing comes to mind is an officer in uniform standing in the middle of the road, directing traffic, or capturing criminals. But, did you know that we have police officers working in the forest? We call them Rangers (Polisi Kehutanan), and they are responsible for protecting the forest.

Forest is natural treasure, a rich blessing for all creatures of the Earth, and their value is immeasurable. Humans can enjoy many benefits offered by the forest—economically, ecologically, or socio-culturally. Therefore, the forest must be managed well to make sure its benefits extend to future generations and, most importantly, to preserve our Mother Earth.

One example of forest benefit currently being developed is genetic species that regulated on Law No. 13/2013. Research shows that forest species provide material for producing medicines and cosmetics. Turning forest areas into tourism sites is also another way of benefitting from the forest. In addition, woods from the forest can be processed by the industry into products such as perfume, wax, oil, paper, and other essentials.

However, many threats are depleting forest resources. Encroachment, poaching, forest fire, and other highly profitable activities have been causing a great deal of damage by ignoring the legal and procedural aspects of the business, as well as forest conservation efforts. Thus, the Rangers play a key role to protect the forest and prevent its destruction.

Through the Sustainable Landscape Partnership program, Conservation International (CI) works together with the Batang Gadis National Park (BGNP) Office to increase the role of Rangers, as follows:

​​Text with Image or Video

Remove this module

Title

EditHeader:
EditAnchor tag for sticky nav:[Optional]

Sections

Image and Text

EditImage Position:leftLeft
    EditSection Title:1. Routine Patrol
    EditSection Title Style:h3Green
      EditImage URL:/global/indonesia/cerita/PublishingImages/patroli_by%20%20TNBG.JPG
      EditImage Description:
      EditText:Every month, the rangers carry out a routine patrol in their work areas. For a more efficient patrol, CI also holds training sessions on how to use the SMART (Spatial Monitoring and Reporting Tool) system. Using the system, the rangers can maintain proper records of violations, supplies, biodiversity potentials, tourism objects, and wildlife encounters during their patrol. The recorded data is then reported as supporting evidence for a follow-up plan on wildlife protection, as well as reference data for wildlife corridors.
      EditLink for Header and Image:[Optional]
      EditPhoto Credit:© Taman Nasional Batang Gadis
      EditPhoto RenditionID Medium:31[Optional]
      EditPhoto RenditionID Large:9[Optional]
      Move UpMove Down

      Image and Text

      EditImage Position:leftLeft
        EditSection Title:2. Community Empowerment
        EditSection Title Style:h3Green
          EditImage URL:/global/indonesia/cerita/PublishingImages/latihan%20%20roasting%20kopi_by%20%20Agnes.JPG
          EditImage Description:
          EditText:To prevent deforestation by the community living around the forest, CI and the rangers provide community assistance by organizing empowerment activities. The assistance includes coffee cultivation training, which teaches them how to grow coffee effectively and package coffee into a finished product.
          EditLink for Header and Image:[Optional]
          EditPhoto Credit:© CI/photo by Agnes Batuara
          EditPhoto RenditionID Medium:31[Optional]
          EditPhoto RenditionID Large:9[Optional]
          Move UpMove Down

          Image and Text

          EditImage Position:leftLeft
            EditSection Title:3. Installation of Camera Trap
            EditSection Title Style:h3Green
              EditImage URL:/global/indonesia/cerita/PublishingImages/camera%20trap_by%20TNBG.JPG
              EditImage Description:
              EditText:Several areas in the BGNP are marked as a Biodiversity Key Area due to its wildlife diversity. The TEAM (Tropical Ecological Assessment and Monitoring) Network Program helps the BGNP staff to find out what species inhabit the areas where camera traps are installed. Based on observation, 29 species listed in the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) Red List of Threatened Species are found there, such as Sumatran Tiger and Tapir.
              EditLink for Header and Image:/global/indonesia/publikasi/Documents/SLP/TEAM%20Report.pdf[Optional]
              EditPhoto Credit:© Taman Nasional Batang Gadis
              EditPhoto RenditionID Medium:31[Optional]
              EditPhoto RenditionID Large:9[Optional]
              Move UpMove Down

              Image and Text

              EditImage Position:leftLeft
                EditSection Title:4. Community Outreach
                EditSection Title Style:h3Green
                  EditImage URL:/global/indonesia/cerita/PublishingImages/polhut_by%20TNBG.JPG
                  EditImage Description:
                  EditText:The BGNP Office also actively provides outreach and extension programs for the community, particularly those living near the national park area, on the importance of forest protection and preservation. Recent activities include Safari Ramadan held by collaborating with various institutions, in which guests were invited to give lectures to community members during Ramadan.
                  EditLink for Header and Image:[Optional]
                  EditPhoto Credit:© Taman Nasional Batang Gadis
                  EditPhoto RenditionID Medium:31[Optional]
                  EditPhoto RenditionID Large:9[Optional]
                  Move UpMove Down
                  Add Image and TextAdd Video and TextAdd Image Thumbnail List

                  In addition, the BGNP Rangers also directly engage the community through casual chats in coffee stalls or by pasting conservation message stickers. On occasions, they visit villages or schools as part of their outreach strategy.

                  It's important to note that being a ranger is a dangerous job that demands great courage when dealing with wild animals and venturing through the forest in cold, rainy, and stormy weather. That's the kind of real situation experienced by Atos Febrisyahma, a BGNP Ranger.

                  "Despite the many challenges, being a Ranger is my calling and I'm proud of it. I hope the future generations of this nation can still enjoy the beautiful nature and thank the God for it, and for this Earth to remain evergreen," said Atos.

                  Thank you for protecting our forest, rangers! (Agnes Batuara/September 9, 2016​​)​​